The Minnesota Medicaid program is for people with low income and is known as Medical Assistance (MA). Low income residents of Minnesota who meet Medicaid eligibility requirements get health care through various health plan providers serving different counties. Minnesota residents that do not get health care through a health plan receive care on a fee-to-service basis. With this option, the health plan providers bill the state directly for the services they offer. Medical Assistance (MA) is Minnesota’s largest Medicaid health care program. The program serves pregnant women, children, adults that do not have children, families, the elderly, the blind and residents with disabilities. Are curious about where to apply for Medicaid? Or are you interested in reviewing the Medicaid application form before attempting to apply?
When people were first shown how to qualify for Medicaid in Minnesota in January of 1996, Minnesota was one of the first six states to put the healthcare scheme into action. Minnesota has always put the needs of residents first when laying the ground rules for Medicaid benefits and the state has been controlling costs through the implementation of Pre-paid Medical Assistance Programs, better known as PMAP Medicaid benefits.
Not surprisingly, the popularity of Medicare Advantage plans varies significantly from one state to another, with only one percent of the Medicare population enrolled in Advantage plans in Alaska (there are no individual Medicare Advantage plans available at all in Alaska; people with Advantage coverage there have employer-sponsored Medicare Advantage plans), versus 56 percent in Minnesota.
TZ Insurance Solutions LLC and the licensed sales agents that may call you are not connected with or endorsed by the U.S. Government or the federal Medicare program. This website does not contain a complete listing of plans available in your service area. For a complete listing please contact 1-800-MEDICARE (TTY users should call (877) 486-2048), 24 hours a day / 7 days a week or consult www.medicare.gov.
What are the income requirements for Medicaid? In the event that an adult’s income exceeds the 135 percent Federal Poverty Level, he or she may sign up for a different kind of care in Minnesota, called MNCare. State tax from Minnesota hospitals and health care providers fund this program, which includes basic health services for people who do not exceed the income requirement for Medicaid in Minnesota.
Not surprisingly, the popularity of Medicare Advantage plans varies significantly from one state to another, with only one percent of the Medicare population enrolled in Advantage plans in Alaska (there are no individual Medicare Advantage plans available at all in Alaska; people with Advantage coverage there have employer-sponsored Medicare Advantage plans), versus 56 percent in Minnesota.
Medicare offers healthcare coverage to Minnesota residents age 65 or older, or to those Minnesota residents that suffer from certain medical disabilities. In 2016, 882,000 people are enrolled in Medicare in Minnesota, accounting for 16.2% of the population in Minnesota. In 2009 an average of about $8,941 was spent per Medicare enrollee in Minnesota, approximately 13.74% lower than the national average of $10,365. Between 2015 to 2030 the number of seniors in Minnesota is expected to rise by an estimated 54.07% according to calculations based off of the 2000 Census. Thus, the number of Medicare enrollees in the state is also projected to grow.
Medicare is a federal program that helps seniors in Minnesota and all over the country pay for their medical expenses. It is a program that is split into two main parts. Part A is a program that covers your hospital care and rehabilitation in case you get injured or sick. Part B will help pay for outpatient care, preventive care, and other forms of health care. If you ever get sick in Minnesota, this federal program will help you pay for it and for some of your medication. But this program will not pay for everything.
If you are under 65 and receiving certain disability benefits from Social Security or the Railroad Retirement Board, you will be automatically enrolled in Original Medicare, Part A and Part B, after 24 months of disability benefits. The exception to this is if you have end-stage renal disease (ESRD). If you have ESRD and had a kidney transplant or need regular kidney dialysis, you can apply for Medicare. If you have amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (also known as ALS or Lou Gehrig’s disease), you will automatically be enrolled in Original Medicare in the same month that your disability benefits start.
As of 2018, there were 370,000 Medicare Cost plan enrollees in Minnesota, but most of them had to switch to new plans (either Medicare Advantage or Original Medicare) for 2019. This is described in more detail below, but Minnesota’s enrollment in private Medicare plans could end up fluctuating significantly for 2019, depending on how many of those enrollees opted to have coverage under Original Medicare versus Medicare Advantage.
If you are a Minnesota resident enrolled in Original Medicare (Part A and Part B), you have options to also enroll in a Medicare Supplement Insurance plan in Minnesota (also called Medigap or MedSupp) to cover health costs not covered under Original Medicare. Costs not covered under Original Medicare might include deductibles, copayments, coinsurance, and other out-of-pocket costs. Most states, including Minnesota, offer Medigap policies with letters corresponding with different Medicare Supplement Insurance plans with certain standardized benefits.
American Indians can continue to use tribal and Indian Health Services (IHS) clinics. We will not require prior approval or impose any conditions for you to get services at these clinics. For elders 65 years and older this includes Elderly Waiver (EW) services accessed through the tribe. If a doctor or other provider in a tribal or IHS clinic refers you to a provider in our network, we will not require you to see your primary care provider prior to the referral.
If you have a Health Savings Account (HSA) with a High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) based on your or your spouse’s current employment, you may be eligible for an SEP. To avoid a tax penalty, you should stop contributing to your HSA at least 6 months before you apply for Medicare. You can withdraw money from your HSA after you enroll in Medicare to help pay for medical expenses (like deductibles, premiums, coinsurance or copayments). If you’d like to continue to get health benefits through an HSA-like benefit structure after you enroll in Medicare, a Medicare Advantage Medical Savings Account (MSA) Plan might be an option.
The best time to enroll in a Medigap plan is during the six-month Medigap open enrollment period which begins the month you’re 65 and you are enrolled in Part B. If you apply for coverage outside of your open enrollment period, you may be required to provide your health history and be medically underwritten. This means you could be denied coverage, or it may cost more.

In the fall of 2013, prior to the launch of the ACA’s exchanges, Minnesota’s total Medicaid/CHIP enrollment stood at 873,040. There were 144,481 new Medicaid enrollments through MNsure, the state-run exchange, from October 2013 through April 2014, and total enrollment in Minnesota’s Medicaid program had grown to 1,066,787 by August 2014, an increase of more than 22 percent over the enrollment total prior to October 2013. Many of these enrollees were already eligible prior to 2014, but were not aware of their eligibility.


When calling, please have your Medicare and/or current plan card available. Caregivers welcome. To explore 2019 Medicare plans on your own, visit the Medicare Plan Finder (Medicare.gov). You’ll be able to create an account, view your current plan, and explore 2019 offerings. After October 15, you’ll also be able to enroll in a plan. Take charge. Start learning about your plan options today! 

Private Medicare Advantage plans are an alternative to Original Medicare. There are pros and cons to either option, and the right solution is different for each person. Plan availability varies by county, but Minnesota’s market is robust: Residents throughout the state can select from among at least 13 Advantage plans in 2019, and some counties have as many as 40 plans for sale.
You have eight months to take action. Your SEP begins when your employer coverage ends or when your employment ends, whichever is first. Contact Social Security or your employer for more information. If you are age 65 and have COBRA through a previous employer, you should enroll in Medicare Part B. You will not get an SEP when COBRA ends.Be sure to enroll in Part B during the first eight months of your COBRA coverage to avoid the late enrollment penalty.
For some services, you pay a deductible, copayment, or co-insurance before Medicare begins to help pay for that service. For Medicare Part B or Part D, or for Medicare Advantage or Medicare Cost plans, you may have to pay a monthly premium, unless you qualify to get help paying for your Medicare premiums, copayments, and deductibles through MA, a Medicare Savings Program (MSP), or the Low Income Subsidy (LIS).
But a Star Tribune review of January enrollment data shows zero-premium plans have been much less popular in Minnesota, with only about 5 percent of state residents who enrolled in a Medicare health plan opting for the coverage. Greiner said her group's analysis of federal data came to the same conclusion; the relatively low interest in zero-premium plans showed up again in recently released figures for February, she said.
In states with lots of rural areas, like Minnesota, Medicare Cost plans tend to be more popular because they offer more flexibility than an HMO. If a plan member gets services inside of the network of Medicare Cost Plans, they work the same way that an HMO works. If the plan member decides to visit a non-network medical provider, Medicare Cost Plans will cover those services the same way that Original Medicare Part A and Part B do. Typically, a Medicare Advantage HMO won’t cover non-emergency services outside of the network at all.
Another wrinkle is that people who want a supplement might have a better chance of getting into the coverage during the transition out of their Medicare Cost plan, when the supplement is provided on a “guaranteed issue” basis. Later, insurance companies can ask questions about a senior’s health status and deny coverage depending on the answers, said Greiner of the Minnesota Board on Aging.
You should pay special attention to the Medicare Open Enrollment Period (OEP), which is also called the Medicare Annual Election Period (AEP). Medicare recipients can enroll in, make changes to or disenroll from a Medicare Advantage plan (Medicare Part C) or a Medicare Prescription Drug plan (Medicare Part D) during this period, which runs from October 15 to December 7 every year. Plan elections made during the 2018 Medicare Open Enrollment Period go into effect January 2019.
Medicare Supplement insurance plans (or Medigap) are voluntary, additional coverage that helps fills the gaps in coverage for Original Medicare. The best time to enroll in a Medicare Supplement insurance plan is during your individual Medigap Open Enrollment Period, which is the six-month period that begins on the first day of the month you turn 65 and have Medicare Part B. If you decide to delay your enrollment in Medicare Part B for certain reasons such as having health coverage based on current employment, your Medigap Open Enrollment Period will not begin until you sign up for Part B.
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