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In February 2013, Governor Mark Dayton signed HF9, a bill that expanded access to Medicaid Assistance (Minnesota’s Medicaid program) under the ACA. News reports in 2013 widely reported that Medicaid expansion was expected to provide health coverage for 35,000 newly-eligible Minnesota residents. But Families USA projected estimated in April 2017 that 222,900 people were enrolled in Medicaid in Minnesota due to expansion.
Medicare Advantage, also known as Medicare Part C, is another way to receive Original Medicare benefits and is offered through private insurance companies. At minimum, all Medicare Advantage plans must offer the same Medicare Part A and Part B benefits as Original Medicare. Some Medicare Advantage plans also include additional benefits, such as prescription drug coverage. You must have Original Medicare, Part A and B, to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan through a private insurer.
If you are enrolled in Medicare Part A and B (Original Medicare), Medigap plans can help fill the coverage gaps in Medicare Part A and Part B. Medigap plans are sold by private insurance companies and are designed to assist you with out-of-pocket costs (e.g. deductibles, copays and coinsurance) not covered by Parts A and B. These plans are available in all 50 states and can vary in premiums and enrollment eligibility. Medigap plans are standardized; however, all of the standardized plans may not be available in your area.
Special enrollment periods remain for most beneficiaries who live in one of the 66 Minnesota counties that are losing their Cost Plans as of Dec. 31 due a change in federal law. As of Jan. 1 Medicare beneficiaries whose Cost Plan ended Dec. 31 and who did not enroll in a new plan will return to Original Medicare (Parts A and B only). Returning to Original Medicare could be costly so these beneficiaries should know that through Feb. 28 they can enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan and a Part D prescription drug plan or through March 4 they can purchase a Medigap policy without a health screening.

Minnesota’s Medicaid program has utilized estate recovery (required under state and federal law) since 1967 as a means of recouping Medicaid costs after an enrollee dies. The estate recovery program applies to people who were 55 or older at the time they incurred Medicaid claims, and the program allowed the state to place leins against the enrollees’ estates, so that some or all of the money would be paid back to the state.Prior to the ACA, it was


If you did not enroll during the IEP when you were first eligible, you can enroll during the General Enrollment Period. The general enrollment period for Original Medicare is from January 1 through March 31 of each year. Keep in mind that you may have to pay a late enrollment penalty for Medicare Part A and/or Part B if you did not sign up when you were first eligible.
“What are the income requirements for Medicaid in MN?” will probably be a question on your mind ahead of the application stage. Coverage up to 200% FPL is available under Medicaid expansion and MNCare. Nine health organizations across the state supply coverage through this specific program and by learning how to qualify for Medicaid in Minnesota, newly eligible residents can enroll in the program. Recipients must know the Medicaid eligibility requirements to take advantage of the benefits administered by state governments.
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In order to help seniors look for the best Minnesota Medicare supplemental insurance and save the most money, you can search online. Instead of wasting gas, money, and time going from provider to provider, you can look at many different supplemental insurance policies side by side online. You can compare these quotes for supplemental insurance until you find the one that is right for you and your current budget. You will be able to use the money that you save on things that you would rather use it on in Minnesota.
Neither Bloomington-based HealthPartners nor Minnetonka-based Medica say they've seen many cases of consumers switching coverage thus far. But Minneapolis-based UCare has been hearing from consumers who are considering a change because they've found their new coverage doesn't include access to certain doctors and hospitals at in-network rates, said Ghita Worcester, a senior vice president with the health insurer.
Minnesota had some of the country’s most generous eligibility guidelines for Medicaid prior to expansion under the ACA (up to 100 percent of poverty for adults with dependent children, and up to 75 percent of poverty for those without dependent children). And the state also became the first in the nation to establish a Basic Health Program under the ACA.
Seniors who lost their Cost plans and are supplementing original Medicare with a stand-alone Part D prescription drug plan have until Thursday to pick a different Part D plan, according to the Minnesota Department of Commerce. Those who lost Cost plans have until March 4 to buy a Medicare Supplement, or Medigap, insurance policy without having to answer questions about their health history — a process known as "medical underwriting" that sometimes prompts carriers to not offer coverage.
Medical Assistance (Medicaid) coverage is available for adults if household income does not exceed 138 percent of poverty (MinnesotaCare, with a small monthly premium, is available for those with income up to 200 percent of poverty), for infants with household income up to 283 percent of poverty, for children 1 – 18 with household incomes up to 275 percent of poverty, and for pregnant women with household incomes up to 278 percent of poverty.
If you do not sign up for Medicare Part B when you are first eligible, you may need to pay a late enrollment penalty for as long as you have Medicare. Your monthly Part B premium could be 10% higher for every full 12-month period that you were eligible for Part B, but didn’t take it. This higher premium could be in effect for as long as you are enrolled in Medicare. For those who are not automatically enrolled, there are various Medicare enrollment periods during which you can apply for Medicare. Be aware that, with certain exceptions, there are late-enrollment penalties for not signing up for Medicare when you are first eligible.
IMPORTANT: The federal Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) had not released the 2018 Medicare Part A and Medicare Part B premiums, deductibles and coinsurance amounts prior to the print deadline for the 2018 edition of Health Care Choices. As a result, the printed edition of Health Care Choices contains 2017 Medicare Part A and B cost sharing amounts.

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The annual open enrollment period for people selecting a Medicare health plan ends Friday, but that doesn’t mean the shopping season is over for more than 300,000 Minnesotans who are losing their Medicare Cost coverage next year. Beginning Saturday, people losing Cost plans will be eligible for a special enrollment period where they have until month’s end to buy replacement coverage that takes effect Jan. 1, and enrollment options that stretch into 2019. (Snowbeck, 12/6) 

Seniors who lost their Cost plans and are supplementing original Medicare with a stand-alone Part D prescription drug plan have until Thursday to pick a different Part D plan, according to the Minnesota Department of Commerce. Those who lost Cost plans have until March 4 to buy a Medicare Supplement, or Medigap, insurance policy without having to answer questions about their health history — a process known as "medical underwriting" that sometimes prompts carriers to not offer coverage.


In the 1980s, in an effort to control costs, Minnesota began implementing PMAP, or pre-paid medical assistance programs.  PMAPs provide blocks of Medicaid funding to non-profit HMOs and a variety of rural health programs across the state. The program was instituted as a demonstration project in 1983, but has continued to be the mechanism by which Medicaid funds are dispersed to providers in Minnesota for three decades.
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As you can see, you have a lot of good choices if you want to compare Medicare Advantage plans in Minnesota for 2019. Calling all of these companies can be difficult and can take forever, but you don’t have to do that to find pricing information. Instead, you can pull it all up with our quote request form, making a comparison easier than it might have ever been before. 

If you’re automatically enrolled in Medicare Part B, but do not wish to keep it you have a few options to drop the coverage. If your Medicare coverage hasn’t started yet and you were sent a red, white, and blue Medicare card, you can follow the instructions that come with your card and send the card back. If you keep the Medicare card, you keep Part B and will need to pay Part B premiums. If you signed up for Medicare through Social Security, then you will need to contact them to drop Part B coverage. If your Medicare coverage has started and you want to drop Part B, contact Social Security for instructions on how to submit a signed request. Your coverage will end the first day of the month after Social Security gets your request.
The legislation that introduced Medicare Advantage also created a competition clause that banned Medicare Cost plans from operating in areas where they faced substantial competition from Medicare Advantage plans, but the implementation of the competition clause was delayed for many years. In 2015, legislation (MACRA) called for the competition clause to be implemented as of 2019.
Minnesota made history for kick-starting the Basic Health Program before any other state in the nation. People who are curious about “what are the Medicaid application guidelines?” will be interested to learn that prior to expansion, the process of learning how to qualify for Medicaid in MN was much more generous than it is now. The Medicaid benefits eligibility rules for adults with dependent children used to be up to 100 percent of poverty or 75 percent for adults without dependents.
If you’re automatically enrolled in Medicare Part B, but do not wish to keep it you have a few options to drop the coverage. If your Medicare coverage hasn’t started yet and you were sent a red, white, and blue Medicare card, you can follow the instructions that come with your card and send the card back. If you keep the Medicare card, you keep Part B and will need to pay Part B premiums. If you signed up for Medicare through Social Security, then you will need to contact them to drop Part B coverage. If your Medicare coverage has started and you want to drop Part B, contact Social Security for instructions on how to submit a signed request. Your coverage will end the first day of the month after Social Security gets your request.
Minnesota seniors (those over 65 years) can apply for MA using a paper Medicaid application form. After filling out the application, it should be taken or mailed to the tribal or county office. Seniors that need help paying for a long-term care facility, for example, a nursing home, should apply online through ApplyMN instead of using a paper application.

Medicare Savings Programs help people on Medicare pay for some of their out-of pocket Medicare costs. The costs paid depend upon your income but can include Medicare Part A and B premiums, co-insurance, copayments, and deductibles. You need to have countable income that is 135% of the Federal Poverty Guidelines (FPG) or less ($1,366/month for an individual, $1,852/month for couples) to qualify for a Medicare Savings Program.

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