If you have health coverage through current employment (either through your work or your spouse’s employer), you may decide to delay Medicare Part B enrollment. You should speak with your employer’s health benefits administrator so that you understand how your current coverage works with Medicare and what the consequences would be if you drop Medicare Part B.
The legislation that introduced Medicare Advantage also created a competition clause that banned Medicare Cost plans from operating in areas where they faced substantial competition from Medicare Advantage plans, but the implementation of the competition clause was delayed for many years. In 2015, legislation (MACRA) called for the competition clause to be implemented as of 2019.
Minnesota Medicare supplemental insurance can provide you with the money that you need to pay for all of those medical expenses that Medicare does not cover. No matter where you live in Minnesota, whether it be Minneapolis, St. Paul, Rochester, or Duluth, you will want to have this extra layer of protection for you or one of your loved ones. The many medical expenses that Medicare does not completely pay for can get rather expensive. You will not want to have to pay for these expenses out of your own pocket while living on a fixed income in Minnesota. 

A pay-per-visit health coverage plan that allows individuals to go to any doctor, hospital, or other health care supplier who accepts Medicare and who is accepting new Medicare patients. The individual is responsible for paying a deductible and copayment. Under Original Medicare, Medicare pays a portion of the Medicare-approved amount, while the individual pays for his/her share (coinsurance).
The Minnesota Medicaid program is for people with low income and is known as Medical Assistance (MA). Low income residents of Minnesota that qualify for Medicaid get health care through various health plan providers serving different counties. Minnesota residents that do not get health care through a health plan receive care on a fee-to-service basis. With this option, the health plan providers bill the state directly for the services they offer… Read More
“It’s important for consumers to review their Medicare coverage and make sure the plan is both affordable and provides access to doctors, clinics, hospitals and pharmacies they want and need,” said Kari Benson, executive director of the Minnesota Board on Aging, which operates the Senior LinkAge Line. “Line specialists can help by providing comprehensive, unbiased Medicare counseling.”
MNsure NavigatorsMNsure has partnered with a number of trusted organizations across Minnesota. The employees of these organizations, known as navigators, are trained to provide face-to-face help with Medicaid applications. MNsure navigators can help residents apply for MinnesotaCare, Medical Assistance or a qualified health plan (with or without cost-sharing and premium tax reductions.). You can call MNsure or use the MNsure navigator online finder to find a navigator in your area. 

Products and services are provided exclusively by our partners, but not all offer the same plans or options. Possible options that may be offered include, but are not limited to, ACA-Qualified Plans, Medicare Plans, Short Term Plans, Christian/Health Sharing Plans, and Fixed Indemnity Plans. Descriptions are for informational purposes only and subject to change. We encourage you to shop around and explore all of your options. We are not affiliated with or endorsed by any government entity or agency.
Neither Bloomington-based HealthPartners nor Minnetonka-based Medica say they've seen many cases of consumers switching coverage thus far. But Minneapolis-based UCare has been hearing from consumers who are considering a change because they've found their new coverage doesn't include access to certain doctors and hospitals at in-network rates, said Ghita Worcester, a senior vice president with the health insurer.
Medicare Part B premiums likely to increase slightly for 2019. Medicare Part B premiums for the coming year aren’t finalized until the fall, but the Medicare Trustees Report that was issued in June 2018 projected an estimated standard Part B premium of $135.50/month in 2019 (see Table V.E2). Even if that premium is finalized, the actual amounts that people pay for Medicare Part B in 2019 will depend on the cost of living adjustment (COLA) that applies to Social Security benefits in 2019.For perspective, for In 2017, most Medicare Part B enrollees paid an average of $109/month for their Part B premium, although enrollees with income above $85,000 had higher premiums. But the standard premium for Medicare Part B was $134/month in 2017. The reason most enrollees paid an average of only $109/month was because the cost of living adjustment (COLA) for Social Security wasn’t large enough to cover the full increase in Part B premiums. For 70 percent of Part B enrollees, their premiums are deducted from their Social Security checks, and net Social Security checks cannot decrease from one year to the next (the “hold harmless” provision). The COLA for 2017 was only enough to cover about four dollars in additional Part B premiums, so the $134/month premium for 2017 only applied to enrollees to whom the “hold harmless” provision didn’t apply. The COLA for 2018 was larger, but still not quite high enough to cover the full increase to $134/month for all enrollees. People who are “held harmless” pay an average of $130/month for Part B in 2018, while the standard premium remains at $134/month. So while there’s still a small difference between what people pay in Part B depending on whether they’re “held harmless,” the difference is not as stark as it was in 2016 and 2017. The difference has mostly leveled out for 2018 (except those with high incomes, who always pay more).Assuming the standard premium increases slightly to about $135.50/month in 2019, and assuming the COLA is adequate to cover an increase of roughly $5.50/month (from the roughly $130/month that the majority of enrollees pay in 2018, to $135.50/month in 2019), that premium amount will apply to all enrollees except those with high incomes (Medicaid covers Part B premiums for some low-income enrollees, regardless of what the standard premium is).
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