If you do not sign up for Medicare Part B when you are first eligible, you may need to pay a late enrollment penalty for as long as you have Medicare. Your monthly Part B premium could be 10% higher for every full 12-month period that you were eligible for Part B, but didn’t take it. This higher premium could be in effect for as long as you are enrolled in Medicare. For those who are not automatically enrolled, there are various Medicare enrollment periods during which you can apply for Medicare. Be aware that, with certain exceptions, there are late-enrollment penalties for not signing up for Medicare when you are first eligible.
Minnesota seniors (those over 65 years) can apply for MA using a paper Medicaid application form. After filling out the application, it should be taken or mailed to the tribal or county office. Seniors that need help paying for a long-term care facility, for example, a nursing home, should apply online through ApplyMN instead of using a paper application.

A federal law passed in 2003 created a “competition” requirement for Medicare Cost plans, which stipulated the plans could not be offered in service areas where there was significant competition from Medicare Advantage plans. Congress delayed implementation of the requirement several times until a law passed in 2015 that called for the rule to take effect in 2019.


People in a Medicare health or prescription drug plan should always review the materials their plans send them, like the “Evidence of Coverage” (EOC) and “Annual Notice of Change” (ANOC). If their plans are changing, they should make sure their plans will still meet their needs for the following year. If they’re satisfied that their current plans will meet their needs for next year and it’s still being offered, they don’t need to do anything.
Each year, most Medicare beneficiaries should receive their Annual Notice of Change (ANOC) and Evidence of Coverage (EOC) from their existing Medicare Advantage and Medicare Part D plan providers by Sept. 30. CMS makes information available to the public on Medicare.gov in October. The Medicare website is also a tremendous asset for individuals with questions about Medicare rules, timelines, Medicare Part D, etc.

Not surprisingly, the popularity of Medicare Advantage plans varies significantly from one state to another, with only one percent of the Medicare population enrolled in Advantage plans in Alaska (there are no individual Medicare Advantage plans available at all in Alaska; people with Advantage coverage there have employer-sponsored Medicare Advantage plans), versus 56 percent in Minnesota.
In states with lots of rural areas, like Minnesota, Medicare Cost plans tend to be more popular because they offer more flexibility than an HMO. If a plan member gets services inside of the network of Medicare Cost Plans, they work the same way that an HMO works. If the plan member decides to visit a non-network medical provider, Medicare Cost Plans will cover those services the same way that Original Medicare Part A and Part B do. Typically, a Medicare Advantage HMO won’t cover non-emergency services outside of the network at all.
If you believe you are eligible for medical assistance benefits, you can begin the process of applying for Medicaid at any time. There are number of simple Medicaid application methods currently available in Minnesota; individuals and families are free to choose any of the methods to apply. It may take up to a month to be approved. You can learn about coverage and costs, eligibility, and all of the application options on our site. Please feel free to review the comprehensive information we have provided.
A Special Needs Plan is a type of Medicare Advantage plan limited to people with certain chronic conditions and  other specific characteristics. Typically, you must receive care from health care providers and hospitals within your SNP network, except for in cases when you need emergency or urgent care and when someone who has End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) needs out-of-area kidney dialysis.
Medicare beneficiaries and their caregivers in Minnesota can receive free, confidential, and unbiased one-on-one health insurance counseling through the State Health Insurance and Assistance Program (SHIP). Senior Medicare Patrol (SMP) is another program which aims to empower seniors to identify, help prevent, and report instances of Medicare waste, fraud and/or abuse.
Starting in April 2018, Medicare beneficiaries began receiving new Medicare ID cards that don’t have Social Security numbers on them. This change was announced in September 2017, and it’s an effort to combat identity theft and fraud. The new cards, which are being mailed out over the course of a year (all beneficiaries will have them by April 2019, as required by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act—MACRA—of 2015), have randomly generated ID numbers instead of Social Security numbers. You can continue to use your current card until your new one arrives. Once it does, you’ll want to destroy and securely dispose of your old one, and begin using the new one instead.

The program for Qualified Individuals (QI) also pays for Part B premiums, though the application approval and benefits are on a “first come, first served” basis. This is sometimes due to limited funding. For an individual to qualify for the QI program, their income must be less than $1,386 a month. The combined income limit for a married couple is $1,872.
You have eight months to take action. Your SEP begins when your employer coverage ends or when your employment ends, whichever is first. Contact Social Security or your employer for more information. If you are age 65 and have COBRA through a previous employer, you should enroll in Medicare Part B. You will not get an SEP when COBRA ends.Be sure to enroll in Part B during the first eight months of your COBRA coverage to avoid the late enrollment penalty.
“It’s important for consumers to review their Medicare coverage  and make sure the plan is both affordable and provides access to doctors, clinics, hospitals and pharmacies they want and need,” said Kari Benson, executive director of the Minnesota Board on Aging, which operates the Senior LinkAge Line. “Line specialists can help by providing comprehensive, unbiased Medicare counseling.”
Most Americans become eligible for Medicare when they turn 65. But younger Americans gain Medicare eligibility after they have been receiving disability benefits for 24 months, or have ALS or end-stage renal disease. Thirteen percent of Minnesota’s Medicare beneficiaries were under age 65 as of 2017, versus 16 percent nationwide. On the high and low ends of the spectrum, 23 percent of Medicare beneficiaries in Alabama, Kentucky, and Mississippi are under 65, while just 9 percent of Hawaii’s Medicare beneficiaries are eligible due to disability.
MA enrollees who qualify for Medicare must enroll in Parts A and B as a condition of their MA eligibility. When an MA eligible person does not qualify for automatic payment of Medicare premiums, the person may be required to enroll in Medicare if the premiums are found to be cost effective. See Referrals to Medicare to determine who must be referred to apply for Medicare and the steps in the referral process.
“What are the requirements for Medicaid in Minnesota?” is a question that many Minnesotans seeking medical coverage may be asking. Candidates who learn how to qualify for Medicaid will improve their chances of a successful application. Minnesota’s Medicaid program, referred to as Medical Assistance (MA), is intended for families and individuals with a financial situation that could be classified as low-income. Most individuals who qualify for Medical Assistance get health care through different health plans. Participants can select a health plan that makes sense for them. Participants who opt to not enroll in a health plan can still receive care, but they will pay on a fee-for-service basis, with health care providers billing the state of Minnesota directly for any services they provide. Understanding Medicaid benefits eligibility guidelines is integral to ensuring that qualified candidates are able to receive assistance. When a candidate meets all Medicaid eligibility requirements, MA provides different types of comprehensive coverage. There are income requirements for Medicaid in Minnesota, just like any other state. Petitioners wanting to know who is eligible for Medicaid in MN can find answers by reviewing the information below.

If you’re automatically enrolled in Medicare Part B, but do not wish to keep it you have a few options to drop the coverage. If your Medicare coverage hasn’t started yet and you were sent a red, white, and blue Medicare card, you can follow the instructions that come with your card and send the card back. If you keep the Medicare card, you keep Part B and will need to pay Part B premiums. If you signed up for Medicare through Social Security, then you will need to contact them to drop Part B coverage. If your Medicare coverage has started and you want to drop Part B, contact Social Security for instructions on how to submit a signed request. Your coverage will end the first day of the month after Social Security gets your request.
Just because a person is able to answer the question “what are the requirements for Medicaid in MN?” it does not mean that he or she will meet the Medicaid eligibility requirements in Minnesota. Visiting Medicaid offices around Minnesota and talking to a member of staff will clear up any misunderstanding about Medicaid qualifications and Medicaid requirements.
Medicare Part B premiums likely to increase slightly for 2019. Medicare Part B premiums for the coming year aren’t finalized until the fall, but the Medicare Trustees Report that was issued in June 2018 projected an estimated standard Part B premium of $135.50/month in 2019 (see Table V.E2). Even if that premium is finalized, the actual amounts that people pay for Medicare Part B in 2019 will depend on the cost of living adjustment (COLA) that applies to Social Security benefits in 2019.For perspective, for In 2017, most Medicare Part B enrollees paid an average of $109/month for their Part B premium, although enrollees with income above $85,000 had higher premiums. But the standard premium for Medicare Part B was $134/month in 2017. The reason most enrollees paid an average of only $109/month was because the cost of living adjustment (COLA) for Social Security wasn’t large enough to cover the full increase in Part B premiums. For 70 percent of Part B enrollees, their premiums are deducted from their Social Security checks, and net Social Security checks cannot decrease from one year to the next (the “hold harmless” provision). The COLA for 2017 was only enough to cover about four dollars in additional Part B premiums, so the $134/month premium for 2017 only applied to enrollees to whom the “hold harmless” provision didn’t apply. The COLA for 2018 was larger, but still not quite high enough to cover the full increase to $134/month for all enrollees. People who are “held harmless” pay an average of $130/month for Part B in 2018, while the standard premium remains at $134/month. So while there’s still a small difference between what people pay in Part B depending on whether they’re “held harmless,” the difference is not as stark as it was in 2016 and 2017. The difference has mostly leveled out for 2018 (except those with high incomes, who always pay more).Assuming the standard premium increases slightly to about $135.50/month in 2019, and assuming the COLA is adequate to cover an increase of roughly $5.50/month (from the roughly $130/month that the majority of enrollees pay in 2018, to $135.50/month in 2019), that premium amount will apply to all enrollees except those with high incomes (Medicaid covers Part B premiums for some low-income enrollees, regardless of what the standard premium is).
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